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Human origins studies in India [Sites web] : position, problems and prospects / by Parth R. Chauhan

Publication : 2006 In : Assemblage, 9, ISSN 1365-3881Description : 99,51 Ko : 3 fig.Langue : Anglais. Auteur principal: Chauhan, Parth R. Résumé : The Indian subcontinent contains one of the richest and continuous records of hominin behavior in the Old World . This evidence is found in diverse paleoecological settings and temporal contexts (particularly in India ), reflecting the successful adaptive strategies of South Asian hominins during the Pleistocene. More importantly, this evidence geographically links similar records of behavior from both the western and eastern parts of the Old World . Despite this significance, however, the subcontinent has received only marginal academic attention and, until recently, its behavioral record was not considered in general human evolutionary syntheses. This is partly explained by the lack of early hominin fossils, a dearth of excavated sites and associated chronometric dates. These drawbacks are directly related to the lack of adequate funding and technical knowledge, complex bureaucracies, and a general lack of interest in paleoanthropology – all of which have hindered prehistoric research in South Asia , at varying levels. Although Indian and Western researchers have recently begun to confront such problems through multidisciplinary excavations and international collaborations, the quality and frequency of this level of research are minimal. Therefore, to foster the immense research and educational potential of South Asian paleoanthropology, greater emphasis needs to be placed (by both academic and government institutions) on the prioritization of research themes and the adoption of modern methodological techniques. This paper briefly reviews the salient features and academic status of the South Asian Paleolithic and its relevance in understanding human evolution in an Asian context. Associated problems (theoretical as well as practical) are discussed and broad solutions are introduced, to modernize and expand paleoanthropological studies in India ..Sujets:paléontologie humaine -- hominidés -- histoire de la préhistoire -- génétique antique Chrono: Paléolithique Lieux: Inde URL: Accès en ligne
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The Indian subcontinent contains one of the richest and continuous records of hominin behavior in the Old World . This evidence is found in diverse paleoecological settings and temporal contexts (particularly in India ), reflecting the successful adaptive strategies of South Asian hominins during the Pleistocene. More importantly, this evidence geographically links similar records of behavior from both the western and eastern parts of the Old World . Despite this significance, however, the subcontinent has received only marginal academic attention and, until recently, its behavioral record was not considered in general human evolutionary syntheses. This is partly explained by the lack of early hominin fossils, a dearth of excavated sites and associated chronometric dates. These drawbacks are directly related to the lack of adequate funding and technical knowledge, complex bureaucracies, and a general lack of interest in paleoanthropology – all of which have hindered prehistoric research in South Asia , at varying levels. Although Indian and Western researchers have recently begun to confront such problems through multidisciplinary excavations and international collaborations, the quality and frequency of this level of research are minimal. Therefore, to foster the immense research and educational potential of South Asian paleoanthropology, greater emphasis needs to be placed (by both academic and government institutions) on the prioritization of research themes and the adoption of modern methodological techniques. This paper briefly reviews the salient features and academic status of the South Asian Paleolithic and its relevance in understanding human evolution in an Asian context. Associated problems (theoretical as well as practical) are discussed and broad solutions are introduced, to modernize and expand paleoanthropological studies in India .

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