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Viticulture et oléiculture grecques et indigènes en Grande Grèce et en Sicile [Extrait] / Jean-Pierre Brun

Publication : 2010 Extrait de : Grecs et indigènes de la Catalogne à la Mer noire, actes des rencontres du programme européen Ramses² (2006-2008) / Aix-en-Provence : Centre Camille-Jullian / édités par Henri Tréziny. Paris : Errance, ISSN 2101-2849 Description : p. 425-431 : fig.Titre de forme: Congrès, Palerme, Université de Palerme, Institut d'archéologie, 2006Langue : Français. Auteur principal: Brun, Jean-Pierre (1955-....) Résumé : Are transfers of technology in fields of olive oil and wine production between Greek and Italic populations archaeologically detectable? Although documentation is still scarce, we have learnt that from the Bronze Age local populations knew how to produce olive oil while from the Iron Age they produced wine. Recent discoveries at Poggiomarino near Pompeii show that vine cultivation, wine production and consumption were common among the Italic populations during the 9th c. BC. On the other hand, a revaluation of the content of Corinthian A and SOS amphorae, which were probably used to transport wine rather oil, implies that Greek settlers did not import their oil from mainland Greece but produced it locally as they did their wine. The first archaeological remains of wine production excavated so far are those of Punta Chiarito on the island of Ischia where, near to a small farm dated from the 6th c. BC, were discovered several vine plantation pits, a press and many jars used to make wine. Other plants, dating from the Classical period, are located in Sicily, around Gela and Camarina, and carpological studies show that the cultivation of olive trees reached a peak during the 4th c. BC in the territory of the Greek colony of Metaponto (Southern Italy). Oil presses are known in the Lucanian territory at Montegiordano near Sybaris, at Monte Moltone near Potenza and in the Sicanian zone at Monte Adranone (Sicily). Just as those of Greek mainland cities or western colonies, they might bear testimony to a rather large diffusion of Greek techniques in the indigenous world. But the available data are still too scant to precisely date these transfer.Sujets:viticulture -- technique agricole -- pressoir à vin -- oléiculture -- colon/indigène Chrono:Protohistoire -- Antiquité gréco-romaine Lieux:Sicile -- Grande-Grèce

Notes bibliogr. Bibliogr. p. 431

Are transfers of technology in fields of olive oil and wine production between Greek and Italic populations archaeologically detectable? Although documentation is still scarce, we have learnt that from the Bronze Age local populations knew how to produce olive oil while from the Iron Age they produced wine. Recent discoveries at Poggiomarino near Pompeii show that vine cultivation, wine production and consumption were common among the Italic populations during the 9th c. BC. On the other hand, a revaluation of the content of Corinthian A and SOS amphorae, which were probably used to transport wine rather oil, implies that Greek settlers did not import their oil from mainland Greece but produced it locally as they did their wine. The first archaeological remains of wine production excavated so far are those of Punta Chiarito on the island of Ischia where, near to a small farm dated from the 6th c. BC, were discovered several vine plantation pits, a press and many jars used to make wine. Other plants, dating from the Classical period, are located in Sicily, around Gela and Camarina, and carpological studies show that the cultivation of olive trees reached a peak during the 4th c. BC in the territory of the Greek colony of Metaponto (Southern Italy). Oil presses are known in the Lucanian territory at Montegiordano near Sybaris, at Monte Moltone near Potenza and in the Sicanian zone at Monte Adranone (Sicily). Just as those of Greek mainland cities or western colonies, they might bear testimony to a rather large diffusion of Greek techniques in the indigenous world. But the available data are still too scant to precisely date these transfer

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