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Theodosius II [ Ouvrage] : rethinking the Roman empire in late antiquity / edited by Christopher Kelly

Publication : Cambridge : Cambridge university press, 2013 Description : 1 vol. (XV-324 p.) : ill. ; 23 cmCollection : Cambridge classical studiesISBN : 9781107038585 ; 1107038588.Langue : Anglais.Pays : Royaume Uni.Autres auteurs: Kelly, Christopher. Editeur.Résumé : Theodosius II (AD 408-450) is the longest reigning Roman emperor. Ever since Edward Gibbon, he has been dismissed as mediocre and ineffectual. Yet Theodosius ruled an empire which retained its integrity while the West was broken up by barbarian invasions. This book explores Theodosius' challenges and successes. Ten essays by leading scholars of late antiquity provide important new insights into the court at Constantinople, the literary and cultural vitality of the reign, and the presentation of imperial piety and power. Much attention has been directed towards the changes promoted by Constantine at the beginning of the fourth century; much less to their crystallisation under Theodosius II. This volume explores the working out of new conceptions of the Roman empire - its history, its rulers and its God. A substantial introduction offers a new framework for thinking afresh about the long transition from the classical world to Byzantium. (source : éditeur).Sujets:empereur -- histoire politique -- impérialisme -- armée romaine -- Concile d'Ephèse Chrono: Antiquité tardive Lieux: Monde romain Anthroponymes: Théodose 2 OEuvres: Code Théodosien
Current location Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Aix-en-Provence : BiAA – Bibliothèque d’Antiquité d’Aix
Libre accès
I 880 (Browse shelf) Available Réunion 19 mai 2015, Accepté, Erasmus BC 4500214081 du 23-07-2015, BL 50023070 du 19-08-2015 0100000019125
Caen : CRAHAM - Centre Michel de Boüard
5749 (Browse shelf) Exclu du prêt

Bibliogr. p. 285-314. Index

Theodosius II (AD 408-450) is the longest reigning Roman emperor. Ever since Edward Gibbon, he has been dismissed as mediocre and ineffectual. Yet Theodosius ruled an empire which retained its integrity while the West was broken up by barbarian invasions. This book explores Theodosius' challenges and successes. Ten essays by leading scholars of late antiquity provide important new insights into the court at Constantinople, the literary and cultural vitality of the reign, and the presentation of imperial piety and power. Much attention has been directed towards the changes promoted by Constantine at the beginning of the fourth century; much less to their crystallisation under Theodosius II. This volume explores the working out of new conceptions of the Roman empire - its history, its rulers and its God. A substantial introduction offers a new framework for thinking afresh about the long transition from the classical world to Byzantium. (source : éditeur)

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