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Late Bronze Age painted pottery traditions at the margins of the Hittite state : papers presented at a workshop held at the 11th ICAANE (München 4 April 2018) and additional contributions / edited by Federico Manuelli and Dirk Paul Mielke
Ouvrage
Appartient aux collections: Access Archaeology, Oxford, 2014-
Publication: Summertown : Archaeopress, 2022 Description: 1 volume (iv-293 p.) : illustrations, cartes, plans ; 28 cmCollection : Access archaeologyTitre de forme: Congrès, Munchen, 2018ISBN: 9781803272016 ; 1803272015.Langue: AnglaisPays: Royaume-Uni Collectivité principale: International congress on the archaeology of the ancient Near East, 11, 2018, Auteur Co-auteur: Manuelli, Federico, 1975-, Directeur de publication; Mielke, Dirk Paul, Directeur de publication Résumé: Late Bronze Age Painted Pottery Traditions at the Margins of the Hittite State is the result of a workshop organized by the editors at the 11th ICAANE held in Munich in 2018 with additional contributions presented by renowned scholars working on this topic. The Late Bronze Age in the Ancient Near East is generally marked by a massive decline in the occurrence of painted pottery and a clear dominance of plain ceramics. This is especially evident when looking at Anatolia. Here, the presence of simple undecorated ceramics is considered as the main distinguishing trait of the dominance of the Hittite State and its material culture. Nevertheless, at the margins of the empire, especially in Southern and South-Eastern as well as Northern Anatolia, painted ceramics are frequently attested and, during recent years, new findings have come to light from a number of excavations. However, a comprehensive analysis of this material has not yet been accomplished. The intent of this volume is to break through the boundaries usually imposed by the study of 2nd millennium BC pottery production in Anatolia and to reconstruct a comprehensive scenario concerning the appearance, evolution, and related historical meanings of these painted pottery traditions. To this end, 12 papers of leading specialists working on relevant material have been collected in this book offering, for the first time, the possibility of a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of painted pottery in the 2nd millennium BC..Note de contenu: Résumé en anglais et en turc au début des contributionsMots libres: kaška . Item type: Ouvrage List(s) this item appears in: MOM-AOR-Année 2023
Holdings
Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Lyon : MOM - Bibliothèque de la Maison de l'Orient et de la Méditerranée Libre accès AOR DS155.5.C4. L3 2022 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 154324

Bibliographie en fin de contributions. Index p. 286-293

Résumé en anglais et en turc au début des contributions

Late Bronze Age Painted Pottery Traditions at the Margins of the Hittite State is the result of a workshop organized by the editors at the 11th ICAANE held in Munich in 2018 with additional contributions presented by renowned scholars working on this topic. The Late Bronze Age in the Ancient Near East is generally marked by a massive decline in the occurrence of painted pottery and a clear dominance of plain ceramics. This is especially evident when looking at Anatolia. Here, the presence of simple undecorated ceramics is considered as the main distinguishing trait of the dominance of the Hittite State and its material culture. Nevertheless, at the margins of the empire, especially in Southern and South-Eastern as well as Northern Anatolia, painted ceramics are frequently attested and, during recent years, new findings have come to light from a number of excavations. However, a comprehensive analysis of this material has not yet been accomplished. The intent of this volume is to break through the boundaries usually imposed by the study of 2nd millennium BC pottery production in Anatolia and to reconstruct a comprehensive scenario concerning the appearance, evolution, and related historical meanings of these painted pottery traditions. To this end, 12 papers of leading specialists working on relevant material have been collected in this book offering, for the first time, the possibility of a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of painted pottery in the 2nd millennium BC.

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