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A cultural history of money. Vol. 1. In Antiquity / Edited by Stefan Krmnicek
Ouvrage
Appartient aux collections: The cultural histories series, London [etc.], 2015-....
Publication: London : Bloomsbury Academic, 2023 Description: 1 vol.(198 p.) : ill. ; 25 cmCollection : The cultural histories seriesISBN: 9781350363816.Langue: AnglaisPays: Royaume-Uni Auteur principal: Krmnicek, Stefan, 1977-...., Directeur de publication Résumé: The origins of the modern, Western concept of money can be traced back to the earliest electrum coins that were produced in Asia Minor in the seventh century BCE. While other forms of currency (shells, jewelry, silver ingots) were in widespread use long before this, the introduction of coinage aided and accelerated momentous economic, political, and social developments such as long-distance trade, wealth creation (and the social differentiation that followed from that), and the financing of military and political power. Coinage, though adopted inconsistently across different ancient societies, became a significant marker of identity and became embedded in practices of religion and superstition. And this period also witnessed the emergence of the problems of money - inflation, monetary instability, and the breakup of monetary unions - which have surfaced repeatedly in succeeding centuries. Drawing upon a wealth of visual and textual sources, A Cultural History of Money in Antiquity presents essays that examine key cultural case studies of the period on the themes of technologies, ideas, ritual and religion, the everyday, art and representation, interpretation, and the issues of the age.Note de contenu: Series Preface, Bill Maurer, University of California Irvine, USA Introduction: Money Made the Ancient World Go Round, Stefan Krmnicek, University of Tübingen, Germany 1. Money and its Technologies: Production, Distribution, and Impact, Andrea Casoli, State Collection of Coins and Medals of the Canton of Ticino, Switzerland and Marc Philipp Wahl, Martin von Wagner Museum, University of Würzburg, Germany 2. Money and its Ideas: State Control and Military Expenses, François de Callataÿ, Free University of Brussels, Belgium 3. Money, Ritual, and Religion: Noneconomic Qualities of Coinage, Stefan Krmnicek, University of Tübingen, Germany 4. Money and the Everyday: Multiple Moneys for Multiple Users, Stéphane Martin, University of Poitiers, France 5. Money, Art, and Representation: A Look at the Roman World, Nathan T. Elkins, Baylor University, USA 6. Money and its Interpretation: Archaeological and Anthropological Perspectives, Alicia Jiménez, Duke University, USA 7. Money and the Issues of the Age: Power, Contact, and Identity, Clare Rowan, University of Warwick, UK Item type: Ouvrage List(s) this item appears in: MOM - 1 - Nouveautés - Novembre 2023 | MOM-REF-Novembre 2023 | MOM-REF-2023
Holdings
Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Lyon : MOM - Bibliothèque de la Maison de l'Orient et de la Méditerranée Libre accès Papier REF AC8.C8. M6 2023 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 159645

Références bibliographiques. Index

Series Preface, Bill Maurer, University of California Irvine, USA
Introduction: Money Made the Ancient World Go Round, Stefan Krmnicek, University of Tübingen, Germany
1. Money and its Technologies: Production, Distribution, and Impact, Andrea Casoli, State Collection of Coins and Medals of the Canton of Ticino, Switzerland and Marc Philipp Wahl, Martin von Wagner Museum, University of Würzburg, Germany
2. Money and its Ideas: State Control and Military Expenses, François de Callataÿ, Free University of Brussels, Belgium
3. Money, Ritual, and Religion: Noneconomic Qualities of Coinage, Stefan Krmnicek, University of Tübingen, Germany
4. Money and the Everyday: Multiple Moneys for Multiple Users, Stéphane Martin, University of Poitiers, France
5. Money, Art, and Representation: A Look at the Roman World, Nathan T. Elkins, Baylor University, USA
6. Money and its Interpretation: Archaeological and Anthropological Perspectives, Alicia Jiménez, Duke University, USA
7. Money and the Issues of the Age: Power, Contact, and Identity, Clare Rowan, University of Warwick, UK

The origins of the modern, Western concept of money can be traced back to the earliest electrum coins that were produced in Asia Minor in the seventh century BCE. While other forms of currency (shells, jewelry, silver ingots) were in widespread use long before this, the introduction of coinage aided and accelerated momentous economic, political, and social developments such as long-distance trade, wealth creation (and the social differentiation that followed from that), and the financing of military and political power. Coinage, though adopted inconsistently across different ancient societies, became a significant marker of identity and became embedded in practices of religion and superstition. And this period also witnessed the emergence of the problems of money - inflation, monetary instability, and the breakup of monetary unions - which have surfaced repeatedly in succeeding centuries.

Drawing upon a wealth of visual and textual sources, A Cultural History of Money in Antiquity presents essays that examine key cultural case studies of the period on the themes of technologies, ideas, ritual and religion, the everyday, art and representation, interpretation, and the issues of the age

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