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A cultural history of work. Vol. 1. In Antiquity / edited by Ephraim Lytle
Ouvrage
Publication: London : Bloomsbury Academic, 2021 Description: 1 vol. (XIII-215 p.) : ill., couv. ill. en coul. ; 25 cmCollection : The Cultural Histories SeriesISBN: 9781350278813.Langue: AnglaisPays: Royaume-Uni, Auteur principal: Lytle, Ephraim, 1975-...., Directeur de publication Résumé: The world of work saw marked developments over the course of antiquity. These were driven by social and economic changes, especially growth in market trade and related phenomena like urbanization and specialization. Although the self-sufficient agrarian household continued to prevail, economic realities everywhere intervened. Corresponding changes include the emergence of archaeologically distinct workplaces and even, in certain times and places, preindustrial factories. A diversity of workplace cultures often defied dominant gender and other social norms. Across an increasingly connected Mediterranean world, work contributed to and was in turn structured by mobility. Other striking developments included the emergence of state-sponsored leisure activities that offered respite from toil for all social classes. Through an exploration of these and other themes, this volume offers a reappraisal of ancient work and its relationship to Greek and Roman culture..Note de contenu: Introduction – Ephraim Lytle (University of Toronto, Canada) 1. The Economy of Work – Seth Bernard (University of Toronto, Canada) 2. Picturing Work – Philip Sapirstein (University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA) 3. Work and Workplaces – Miko Flohr (Leiden University, Netherlands) 4. Workplace Cultures - Koenraad Verboven (Ghent University, Belgium) 5. Work, Skill, and Technology - Philip Sapirstein (University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA) 6. Work and Mobility – Ben Akrigg (University of Toronto, Canada) 7. Work and Society - Sarah E. Bond (University of Iowa, USA) 8. The Political Culture of Work – Alain Bresson (University of Chicago, USA) 9. Work and Leisure - Zinon Papakonstantinou (University of Illinois at Chicago, USA) Item type: Ouvrage List(s) this item appears in: MOM-REF-Novembre 2023 | MOM - 1 - Nouveautés - Novembre 2023 | MOM-REF-2023
Holdings
Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Lyon : MOM - Bibliothèque de la Maison de l'Orient et de la Méditerranée Libre accès Papier REF AC8.C8. W6 2021 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 104860

Bibliogr. p. [200]-205. Index.

Introduction – Ephraim Lytle (University of Toronto, Canada)
1. The Economy of Work – Seth Bernard (University of Toronto, Canada)
2. Picturing Work – Philip Sapirstein (University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA)
3. Work and Workplaces – Miko Flohr (Leiden University, Netherlands)
4. Workplace Cultures - Koenraad Verboven (Ghent University, Belgium)
5. Work, Skill, and Technology - Philip Sapirstein (University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA)
6. Work and Mobility – Ben Akrigg (University of Toronto, Canada)
7. Work and Society - Sarah E. Bond (University of Iowa, USA)
8. The Political Culture of Work – Alain Bresson (University of Chicago, USA)
9. Work and Leisure - Zinon Papakonstantinou (University of Illinois at Chicago, USA)

The world of work saw marked developments over the course of antiquity. These were driven by social and economic changes, especially growth in market trade and related phenomena like urbanization and specialization. Although the self-sufficient agrarian household continued to prevail, economic realities everywhere intervened. Corresponding changes include the emergence of archaeologically distinct workplaces and even, in certain times and places, preindustrial factories. A diversity of workplace cultures often defied dominant gender and other social norms. Across an increasingly connected Mediterranean world, work contributed to and was in turn structured by mobility. Other striking developments included the emergence of state-sponsored leisure activities that offered respite from toil for all social classes. Through an exploration of these and other themes, this volume offers a reappraisal of ancient work and its relationship to Greek and Roman culture.

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