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A cultural history of medicine. Vol. 1. In Antiquity / edited by Laurence Totelin
Ouvrage
Appartient aux collections: The cultural histories series, London [etc.], 2015-....
Publication: London [etc.] : Bloomsbury Academic, 2021 Description: 1 vol. (IX-272 p.) : illustrations ; 25 cmCollection : The cultural histories seriesISBN: 9781472569936.Langue: AnglaisPays: Royaume-Uni Auteur principal: Totelin, Laurence M.V., 19..-...., historien de la médecine, Directeur de publication Résumé: Patient, disease and physician were the three corners of the 'medical triangle' according to one of the texts attributed to Hippocrates, a famous ancient Greek doctor. This volume, covering a period from roughly 800 BCE to 800 CE, examines and deconstructs these three aspects of ancient medicine in the Mediterranean world. It shows that, while physicians sought to assert themselves as experts in the medical art, they had to contend with numerous other healers whose methods, remedies and tools patients often favoured. It explores the ways in which civic entities, cities, kingdoms and empires, and their officials directly and indirectly shaped medical encounters and discoveries. It examines the interaction between medicine and the environment, non-human animals and plants. To attempt a cultural history of medicine in antiquity requires bringing together a wealth of sources: the texts attributed to Hippocrates, Galen and other medical authors are not neglected, but they are studied alongside other literary and historical works, letters on papyri, funerary inscriptions celebrating healers, surgical tools and bioarchaeological remains. While discussing the enduring cultural impact of classical Greek and Roman medicine in the West, through texts such as the Hippocratic Oath or names of diseases and types of medicines, this volume reveals the various ways in which health, disease and medical treatments were experienced diversely in the ancient world, according to gender, socio-economic class and ethnicity.Note de contenu: 1. Environment, Ido Israelowich 2. Food, John Wilkins 3. Disease, Julie Laskaris 4. Animals, Chiara Thumiger 5. Objects, Patty Baker 6. Experiences, Rebecca Flemming 7. Mind/Brain: Medieval Concepts, David Leith 8. Authority: Trusting the Text in the Early Middle Ages, Laurence M. V. TotelinAuteur comme sujet: Hippocrate (0460-0377 av. J.-C.) . ; Galien, Claude (0131?-0201?) . . Item type: Ouvrage List(s) this item appears in: MOM - 1 - Nouveautés - Novembre 2023 | MOM-REF-Novembre 2023 | MOM-REF-2023
Holdings
Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Lyon : MOM - Bibliothèque de la Maison de l'Orient et de la Méditerranée Libre accès Papier REF AC8.C8. M4 2021 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 104866

Bibliogr. p. [229]-250. Sources p. [211]-228. Notes bibliogr. en fin de chapitre. Index

1. Environment, Ido Israelowich
2. Food, John Wilkins
3. Disease, Julie Laskaris
4. Animals, Chiara Thumiger
5. Objects, Patty Baker
6. Experiences, Rebecca Flemming
7. Mind/Brain: Medieval Concepts, David Leith
8. Authority: Trusting the Text in the Early Middle Ages, Laurence M. V. Totelin

Patient, disease and physician were the three corners of the 'medical triangle' according to one of the texts attributed to Hippocrates, a famous ancient Greek doctor. This volume, covering a period from roughly 800 BCE to 800 CE, examines and deconstructs these three aspects of ancient medicine in the Mediterranean world. It shows that, while physicians sought to assert themselves as experts in the medical art, they had to contend with numerous other healers whose methods, remedies and tools patients often favoured. It explores the ways in which civic entities, cities, kingdoms and empires, and their officials directly and indirectly shaped medical encounters and discoveries. It examines the interaction between medicine and the environment, non-human animals and plants. To attempt a cultural history of medicine in antiquity requires bringing together a wealth of sources: the texts attributed to Hippocrates, Galen and other medical authors are not neglected, but they are studied alongside other literary and historical works, letters on papyri, funerary inscriptions celebrating healers, surgical tools and bioarchaeological remains. While discussing the enduring cultural impact of classical Greek and Roman medicine in the West, through texts such as the Hippocratic Oath or names of diseases and types of medicines, this volume reveals the various ways in which health, disease and medical treatments were experienced diversely in the ancient world, according to gender, socio-economic class and ethnicity

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